The evidence continues to increase that children do not recover as well from traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) as once thought. In fact, the children that do not die from severe TBIs may face a lifetime of difficulties. While the awareness of the true consequences of children’s TBIs increases, the incidences of the injury also continue to rise.

Long-Term Difficulties

It is now known that the consequences of a TBI in childhood are long-term in nature. The new research was presented at this year’s American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference that shows a heightened risk of mental health issues and cognitive difficulties up to five years after the date of the TBI. Other difficulties included increased incidences of:

  • Headaches
  • Depression
  • Intellectual impairment

Proactive Measures

Prevention of TBIs is the most straightforward way to keep brain injury from happening. A variety of sports organizations have stricter guidelines in the form of revised rules and equipment requirements. Even though some TBIs are not preventable, increased recognition of childhood TBIs in the medical community can catch more cases of the injury.

Good News

The good news is that a protocol of thorough medical and mental health monitoring can catch potential problems before they become issues that seem insurmountable. Quickly mobilizing help for the child after difficulties arise is another essential component of injury management. A variety of medical, educational and mental health services can help children with a past TBI get the most out of life as possible.